Fashion : The most powerful Art Form there is..

The always inspiring Blair Waldorf says : ‘Fashion is the most powerful art there is. It’s movement, design and architecture all in one. It shows the world who we are and who we’d like to be.

According to Webster’s New World Dictionary, Art is defined as aesthetic work. Art is supposed to be an expression of yourself, your soul and desires and dreams and even agony. Aesthetic work could be anything a painting, sculpture, music or even FASHION!!

Fashion throughout the world has evolved through the centuries. From the clothes that were worn in Williamsburg in the early Seventeen hundreds to what people wear today.  As fashion evolved, one thing remained constant; fashion could be seen as a form of art

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From the first couturier Charles Worth and his designs, fashion always had a purpose. To show who is richer, who has the upper hand. Fashion has always been a tool to divide and tell a story of the power, position, status and even job description.

In many ways, the Oxford Dictionary’s definition of art as “the expression or application of human creative skill and imagination, typically in a visual form such as painting or sculpture, producing works to be appreciated primarily for their beauty or emotional power,” puts fashion in the same realm as art. Fashion, when executed at the hands of certain designers, can be expression or application of human creative skill and imagination.

As Instyle Magazine says,

But the relationship between art and fashion isn’t always linear; it’s as tangled as a Cy Twombly scribble. From Schiaparelli and Salvador Dali’s surrealist lobster dress to Takashi Murakami’s cherry blossom print purses for Louis Vuitton, the grandest magic often happens when the two disciplines deliberately intersect.

“Fashion is so close in revealing a person’s inner feelings and everybody seems to hate to lay claim to vanity so people tend to push it away. It’s really too close to the quick of the soul.” Stella Blum

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As with art, the cultural relevance of fashion as a mirror of the habits and tastes of times past needs no proof. Fashion as an artefact of culture teaches us about our and other societies’ histories. However, the line between fashion and art becomes more blurred when we look to more current instances of how fashion is presented.

Fashion can tell you what people wore at a certain period just as pottery can tell you what their tea parties were like.Fine art at the moment is no longer particularly concerned with beauty, so you could say that fashion – which is always about a concept of beauty, whether or not everyone agrees on the concept – is more relevant, more artistic, than the garbage they put out as conceptual. If you look at it that way, fine art may go by the wayside, and fashion, which has a bit more effort put into it, will take over.

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Fashion tells stories of the designers just like art shows true character of the artist. There is not aStella McCartney piece that doesn’t scream of her 70’s roots and her parent’s influence. Every Dior garment screams of its character, the epitome of true feminity and grace. Every garment is a statement the designer wants to make, just like a painting.

Watching a fashion show can make you feel like you feel after visiting a powerful art exhibit, or taking the trouble to see a great band play live. Just as the costumes help to complete a film, or lights can contribute to the impact of concert, the live performances, sounds, lighting, the sheer brilliance that goes in creating the concept and bringing it to life in the clothes.

The life of a designer is a life of fight. Fight against the ugliness. Just like a doctor fights against disease. For us, the visual disease is what we have around, and what we try to do is cure it somehow with design. Massimo Vignelli

 What you wear is how you present yourself to the world, especially today, when human contacts are so quick. Fashion is instant language. Miuccia Prada

In the sense that art can bring about a feeling of awe because of its beauty, a fashion show can bring tears to the eyes of editors because of its powerful aesthetic impact. It is precisely the tension between functionality and aesthetics that lies at the heart of fashion’s artistic potential. This potential is unleashed first by the designer’s intention and ultimately fulfilled by the audience’s interpretation. In this sense, modern fashion, like modern art is a catalyst for dialogue and an exchange of ideas.

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Exhibitions, like the particular case of Martin Margiela, are evidence of this evolution in the reception of fashion. By making a notoriously conceptual designer more accessible it exposed the underlying message that any exhibition carries, whether it is about art or fashion. It offers, as Kaat Debo poignantly states, “an introduction to a type of aesthetic which people might not come across every day. It broadens the horizons of the viewer, forces them to look at fashion from a different angle.” In other words, if the art of fashion is executed well, it has the power to renew our view of the word and lets us experience it through visionary eyes.

Anything that can truly connect you to emotions, deep or on the surface, is art; and fashion, for whatever reason, it made me feel connected. And that’s what great art does.

Music to go along with the post :

  • The Drums- Down by the Water
  •  Sohodolls – Stripper by
  • Cold War Kids – Hang me up to dry
  • Finger Eleven’s jam – Paralyzer
  • Robyn- Dancing on my Own

Image References :

The ‘Schiaparelli And Prada: Impossible Conversations’ at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

http://devilinspiredvictorianclohting.blogspot.in/2013/06/fashion-for-women-during-victorian-era.html

Blurred Lines

aAdi Goodrich Set design art direction illustrator inspiration cool photography fashion art layout colourful

http://www.marionhume.com/tag/maison-martin-margiela/

Quotes :

https://www.notjustalabel.com/editorial/art-fashion

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